World of Discovery series returns

The World of Discovery series is back at the Delaware Museum of Nature and Science.

Join us for the World of Discovery lecture series at the Delaware Museum of Nature and Science. This fall, we welcome scientists from the University of Delaware College of Earth, Ocean and Environment to present an in-depth look at the pioneering research impacting the future of Earth’s ecosystems.

The Complex Past and Future Trajectory of Coral Reefs

Wednesday, November 8 | 7 p.m.

Coral reefs have long been recognized as the “rainforests of the sea,” with fantastic biodiversity and ecological importance. However, they represent a paradox between the long-term success and resilience of evolution and growth over millions of years and an incredibly fragile ecosystem that is losing a global race against climate change and a host of local threats. This presentation will introduce several aspects of the science behind how coral reefs have been so successful, how they are threatened, and how some scientists are racing to understand what can be done to slow and manage the loss of this critically important ecosystem.

Mark Warner is a Professor in the School of Marine Science and Policy at the College of Earth, Ocean and Environment at the University of Delaware. He studied marine biology at Northeastern University and the University of Georgia (UGA), where he received his bachelor’s degree in zoology and doctorate in ecology. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship in plant biology at UGA, he joined the faculty of the University of Delaware in 2001. He is a Fellow of the International Coral Reef Society and has studied the ecological physiology of reef-building corals for over 30 years in many western and eastern Pacific locations, the Andaman and Red Sea, and the Caribbean.


Past events

Exploring the hidden lives of sharks

Wednesday, October 11 | 7 p.m.

Sharks capture the public’s attention like no other species, as demonstrated by the popularity of Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week” and the frequency with which stories of sharks “lurking” in local waters grab headlines. However, despite the great public interest in sharks and the important role they play in marine ecosystems, these animals remain misunderstood and challenging to study. Learn how new research is shedding light on the biology and ecology of sharks and how scientists are using cutting-edge technologies to view the hidden lives of sharks and aid in the conservation and management of these iconic predators.

Aaron Carlisle is an Assistant Professor in the School of Marine Science and Policy at the University of Delaware. He has studied the biology and ecology of fishes for the last 20 years, largely focusing on elasmobranch (sharks, skates, and rays) and pelagic fishes (tunas, billfishes).